From we to I

Perfection

My observations and ideas on perfection were recorded on September 6, 1995. They were written once with we and once with I. They create a better connection together.

I am not perfect
But whenever I show myself to be less than perfect, I am distressed
I hate mistakes, I hate shortcomings, I hate deficiencies, I hate to do things wrong
It bothers me, it disturbs my sleep, it disturbs my equilibrium
Is this a normal human condition?
Does everyone labour over this, uncontrollably, agonizingly?
Does everyone try to find ways to excuse, to ameliorate, to overcome the feeling of uncertainty and insecurity that mistakes and failures and shortcomings induce?
Does everyone feel as shaken as I?
Or can we genuinely accept the reality. Feel comfortable with the inevitable.

We are not perfect. We cannot be perfect. We can only strive to be perfect. Or should we even strive to be perfect? Is perfection desirable, particularly since it is not attainable? Should we be striving for something else?

We all have our parts. We are all given our parts. Some are given what appear to be better parts than others. Lead parts, glamorous parts, perfect parts. Or are they better parts? Or simply different parts? Is a supporting part less desirable, or less important, or less rewarding a part? Is a small part less than a large part? There is always a better part if we compare. There is always someone better if we compare. It is not possible for a part to have everything, to be perfect. It is not possible for anybody to play their part perfectly.

With every endeavour, with every role we play and every charge we take on, there is risk. Risk we will not perform perfectly. Even worse is the risk of exposure. That others will see our imperfection, see our failure.

I am not perfect. I cannot be perfect. I can only strive to be perfect. Or should I even strive to be perfect? Is perfection desirable, particularly since it is not attainable? Should I be striving for something else?

I have my part. I have been given my part. Some are given what appear to be better parts than I. Lead parts, glamorous parts, perfect parts. Or are they better parts, or simply different parts?
Is a supporting part less desirable, or less important, or less rewarding a part? Is a small part less than a large part? There is always a better part if I compare. There is always someone better if I compare. It is not possible for a part to have everything, to be perfect. It is not possible for anybody to play their part perfectly.

With every endeavour, with every role I play and every charge I take on, there is risk. Risk I will not perform perfectly. Even worse is the risk of exposure. That others will see my imperfection, see my failure.

We admire perfection. It is how we sort people in our minds. We measure ourselves against perfection. We measure others against perfection. It is good. It is how we grow. It is how we accomplish. It is how we contribute. The better we play our part the greater the contribution. The better we play our part the more opportunity we get to play a better part. A better part is a part that makes a greater contribution.

Perfection can only be measured comfortably by how successful I am in the role I am given, not in how many mistakes I make in the process. Nonsense. If I hadn’t made a mistake, I would have performed better, contributed more. Or is there a difference between performing and contributing? A subtle difference.

Or is it like learning how to play the piano? Enjoy the experience, not the admiration. Know that when I take on more difficult parts I will make mistakes. Know that even when I play parts I have played perfectly many times before that I will still make the occasional mistake. Don’t dwell on the mistake. Play on. Don’t dwell on the mistakes. Try to play the part again. And occasionally the audience may walk away. There will be another. Or maybe we’re the only audience that matters.

I see these questions now in a larger context and with a greater appreciation and understanding of our common human experiences, our common human nature, and our common human interests

Can we change the way we see and do things to improve our experience of life, and our ability to contribute to one another’s experience of life, and our ability to create possibilities for ourselves, and for our future, and for the future of our world?

Can I change the way I see and do things to improve my experience of life, and my ability to contribute to the experience of life for others, and my ability to create possibilities for myself, and for my future, and for the future of my world?

We are given roles by our experience, and by how others we experience, and by others who experience us, and by the experiences we create with others and for others.

We create our role as we create our experience, and as our experience creates us, and as we create with our experience.

Connections

www.exploringournature.com
www.creatingwithnature.com

The quantum idea
Creating with our experience